Hospitals Discover the Benefits and Ease of Antimicrobial Copper

Hospitals Discover the Benefits and Ease of Antimicrobial Copper
24 May 2016

Even in the most proactive hospitals, bacteria can reside on surfaces for weeks and even months. But by simply installing antimicrobial copper hardware, hospitals across the country are supplementing their infection control programs.  Antimicrobial copper kills more than 99.9 percent of bacteria* on surfaces within two hours in between routine cleanings and requires no additional staff training or special maintenance.

Watch these two new videos from CDA that demonstrate the benefits of antimicrobial copper components using real-world examples from hospitals that have become early adopters of this technology:

 

Antimicrobial copper components can easily be installed or retrofitted in a matter of minutes. In many cases, all you need is a screwdriver.

 

Cleaning and maintaining the attractive appearance of antimicrobial copper components is quite simple. Routine cleaning to remove dirt and grime is necessary, but that’s all it takes for antimicrobial copper surfaces to remain effective.

 

*EPA public health registration for copper alloys

*In the U.S., after rigorous testing, the EPA registered many copper based alloys, such as brass and bronze, as public health products that continuously kill six bacteria that cause infections.  Laboratory testing shows that, when cleaned regularly, antimicrobial copper surfaces kill greater than 99.9 percent of the following bacteria within two hours of exposure: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE), Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and E. coli O157:H7. Antimicrobial copper surfaces are a supplement to and not a substitute for standard infection control practices and have been shown to reduce microbial contamination, but do not necessarily prevent cross contamination or infection; users must continue to follow all current infection control practices.

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